Sweden

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Sweden set up a DNA database in 1998. According to Interpol, Sweden's DNA database contained 21,416 crime scene DNA profiles, 91,684 reference DNA profiles from individuals, plus 400 other DNA profiles in 2011. A DNA database legislation had been adopted at that time.

Resources

Detailed analysis

The legislation concerning the national DNA database of DNA profiles is found in Code of Judicial Procedure, Chapter 28, Article 12-13 and in the Police Data Act (1998:622), Article 22-28[1],[2]

Persons serving a prison sentence of 4 years or more, suspects charged of an offence that could lead to a prison sentence of 4 years or more (approval of prosecutor is required), and all crime scene stains[3]

There are no restrictions to the entry of DNA profiles that are derived from unidentified crime scene stains. The DNA profiles of crime suspects can be entered into the database when this penalty is in proportion to the prison sentence they may have to serve. The DNA profiles of convicted offenders can be entered into the database when they are condemned to another sentence than a monetary one.

The police have the authority to collect DNA samples from crime suspects and unidentified crime scene stains, but not from convicted offenders. The taking of a DNA sample from a minor is not allowed. The taking of a DNA sample from mentally ill persons is allowed when they are suspected of a crime.

Convicted persons’ profiles are kept for twenty years after their entry for individuals sentenced to no more than six years, thirty years for individuals sentenced to more than six years, or at most twenty years after the individual’s death; suspects’ profiles are removed upon acquittal and crime scene stains are deleted after twelve, twenty, or eighty years depending on the severity of the underlying offense[4]

The DNA profiles that are derived from unidentified crime scene stains have to be removed from the database when a match is made, when the crime is solved in a different way than by DNA profiling or, depending on the severity of the crime, after fifteen or thirteen years. The DNA profiles of crime suspects have to be removed upon acquittal. The DNA profiles of convicted offenders have to be removed ten years after the passing of their sentence.

Have to be destroyed twenty years after their creation for individuals sentenced to no more than six years, thirty years for individuals sentenced to more than six years, or at most twenty years after the individual’s death; suspects’ samples must be destroyed upon their acquittal[5]

The DNA samples of crime suspects and convicted offenders have to be destroyed as soon as possible and can in any case no longer be retained than six months after the DNA profiles have been created.

National Laboratory of Forensic Science. The National Police Board is responsible for the database.

The database managers and the DNA scientists of the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science have access to all information that is contained in the database. DNA profiles can be exchanged with the other EU Member States through Interpol. It is an Oracle database in combination with CODIS.


  1. E.U. 9445/1/06 at 8.
  2. The DNA profiles of persons convicted of serious crimes against a person’s life or health, personal integrity or security or crimes involving public danger, are inserted in our national DNA database if the crime can lead to an imprisonment for more than two years. The database only includes DNA profiles regarding the identity.
  3. See EU Current Practices at 77.
  4. See EU Current Practices at 77-78.
  5. See EU Current Practices at 78.